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ARRL Audio News - November 17, 2017

ARRL Audio News - Fri, 11/17/2017 - 13:03
ARRL Audio News - November 17, 2017
Categories: Amateur Radio

The Perfect Cup of “Camp” Coffee

Badlands Off Road Adventures - Fri, 11/17/2017 - 11:14

Sunrise in the Badlands

It was a frosty Sunday morning. I was camping in the North Dakota  Badlands, Slope County. Though early, a clear blue sky surrounded us. Save for the light chatter around the campfire, there wasn’t a sound. With no plans for the morning, I stayed put for a while and enjoyed the camaraderie of fellow campers in the site. Rounding out a delicious breakfast was a cup of steaming homemade coffee. I remember thinking, This is the way to start a day!

I’ve been a coffee drinker most of my adult life. While I enjoy drinking coffee in general, a cup of joe just seems to taste better outdoors.

What makes a great cup of coffee? Fights have broken out over more mundane issues. Because I’d like to remain on cordial grounds with you and my other readers, I’ll keep this as neutral as possible. Believe it or not, it is possible to mess up a simple cup of coffee. But it is also possible to enjoy a great cup of coffee outdoors.

While, I can taste a difference in the first few mouth fulls, I am happy just to have a hot, black, caffeinated cup of liquid whether weak, bitter, strong, smooth or something in between is OK. And it is even better, when someone has it made, when I get up!

Some fundamentals of making coffee

You wouldn’t think there’s much to making a pot of coffee. And, in fact, there is not. But there are some basics to keep in mind for that ideal campfire coffee.

Coffee pot: Make sure it’s designed for use over a campfire. The standard kitchen variety won’t cut it outdoors. Beyond that, any style or brand is fine. One thing to consider is its capacity: Does it produce enough coffee for your entire group?

Manufacturers often claim that their coffee pots hold eight cups of coffee. What they don’t tell you is that it’s based on a 6-ounce coffee cup. That is a typical size, but some are larger. In addition, few people drink just one cup of coffee at a time. (I don’t just drink one cup!)

Consider those factors when you decide how many and which size of coffee pots to bring.

Coffee: I’ll leave the brand up to you; you know what you like. A key factor is the grind. There are seven categories: extra course, course, medium course, medium, medium fine, fine and extra fine. Course or extra course are good for cowboy coffee; medium is good for drip and perked. Start in the middle (medium) and go up or down to get something you like. If a special grind or mix is required, do the prep work before leaving. Those steps can be challenging at a campsite.

It’s all about getting the essence out of the coffee. If the coffee is under extracted, you get a sour, salty taste. If it’s over extracted, the coffee is bitter. Experience will teach you the proper mix of heat, coffee and time to get that perfect cup.

——————————————————————————————————-
“Black as the devil, hot as hell, pure as an angel, sweet as love.”
French politician and diplomat Charles Maurice de Talleyrand (1754-1838) on coffee
———————————————————————————————————

Brewing the coffee: Coffee is brewed a number of ways. You can make cowboy coffee, perk it, or use one of several forms of drip (pour over, French press, drip funnel). We ruled out instant coffee except for the direst of circumstances.

Most recipes I have seen recommend water temperature at about 200 degrees (just below boiling – the acceptable range is 195 to 205) and a ratio of two tablespoons per cup. Remember that is a 6-ounce cup (¾ of an eight-ounce cup). If you don’t have a tablespoon or a standard coffee measure, use a Tequila shot glass. 1 oz. equals 2 tablespoons. If you prefer a particularly robust cup of coffee – add more grounds or change the roast.

Cowboy coffee is almost as fast as instant except you use freshly ground (medium grind) coffee. A recipe is provided below. You try to replicate as closely as possible how coffee was made back in the cowboy days.

With cowboy coffee you get some floaties. There always are a few grains of coffee that don’t mix in. Adding a little cold water will force them to sink. Worst case, just spit ‘em out.

Handling the coffee grounds

Even though coffee grounds are biodegradable, they must be disposed of properly. There was a time, perhaps, when you just chucked ‘em in the weeds. As good stewards of the land, we four wheelers subscribe to the TreadLightly® philosophy. And as you know, that pertains to all activities while outdoors, not just driving habits.

As with all your other garbage, coffee grounds should be placed in the proper garbage bag (Trasharoo, for example). If the smell of the grounds bothers you or you think it might attract critters, first place the grounds in a smaller bag. A used bread bag or Ziploc® bag works well for this. Be a good sport and take your garbage with you.

How to make your cowboy coffee

Cowboy coffee is quite easy to make. There are just a few ingredients and a few steps.

  • Bring the water to a boil.
  • Take the coffee pot off the heat and let set 20-30 seconds. This will bring the temperature down to about 200 degrees (at sea level).
  • Add the coffee, at a mixture of 2 tablespoons for each 6-ounce cup of coffee. Stir briefly and let set for 4 to 5 minutes (you can stir once more halfway through if you want).
  • An alternative is to bring the pot to boil with the coffee already in the pot for only 1 minute. The risk is missing when it started to boil.
  • Let it set another 2- 3 minutes to settle the grounds, or pour cold water on the top.
  • Enjoy your robust coffee in the great outdoors!

Nothing could be easier and you don’t need any special equipment. On top of that, the coffee doesn’t care if you cook with wood, propane or buffalo dung.

Perked Coffee

This is a common way to make coffee when camping.

  • Use the same ratio of water to coffee ¾ cup water – 2 Tablespoons coffee
  • Once the pot starts to perk, turn down the heat to providing a vigorous perk but not boiling over.
  • The water that tops out of the percolator will be in the sweet spot of 195 to 205 even if the coffee water in the pot is boiling
  • Perk for 4 minutes and let stand one minute and pour into your cup

BTW, I always make enough for a 2nd cup and to share a cup or two. If I am using a percolator, I believe they brew better with close to the number of cups the pot is designed – just below the holes in the pour spout.

I want to keep the coffee hot as possible for that second cup.  The technique I use is to set the hot pot on one dish cloth and wrap a second one around it. The thought that I should have a cozy, passes through my brain but is well forgotten by the time I could purchase one. Besides The dish towel serve multiple uses.

The next time you go camping, taking along this recipe. First thing each morning, brew up a pot of rich, full-bodied cowboy coffee. Savor those moments as you watch the sun rise in the distance. You’ll soon realize those are some really precious times. And if we cross paths while on the trail, we’ll enjoy a cup together.

#   #   #

Did you miss the previous article?

 

Some Upcoming Events (click on the link for details)

Memorial Day in the Inyo Mountains

November 2017

December 2017

January 2018

Yellow is back in stock! The Orange and Red went fast last time with blue not far behind so if you want a specific color order now while we have most of them available. The Bandana layout follows the “Vehicle Recovery Plan” with pathways to more detail. A unique section of the Bandana, gives the steps for a “Winch Rigging Check: Walk through” so that you verify every element of the rigging before you commit to the pull. Stuff this in your recovery kit and you will always be ready. Warning – the Bandana is not a substitute for proper training and use of quality equipment used within the bounds of their safe working load. We advise you to use the information provided in the Winching Recovery Bandana at your own risk. We cannot control the quality and specifications of the equipment used and the methods actually employed. The original press release with larger graphics is on the website .

73
KI6FHA
I hope to see you on the trails!
Tom Severin, President
Badlands Off Road Adventures, Inc.
4-Wheel Drive School
310-613-5473
www.4x4training.com
Make it Fun. Keep it Safe.

If you find this information valuable, please pass it on to a friend. You can forward them the email. If you received a forwarded copy of this newsletter and would like to subscribe for yourself, go to: www.4x4training.com/w/contact-us.html and follow the instructions to join our mail list.

Want To Use This Article In Your Magazine, E-Zine, Club Newsletter Or Web Site?
You are welcome to use it anytime, just be sure to include the following author/copyright information: Tom Severin, 4×4 Coach, teaches 4WD owners how to confidently and safely use their vehicles to the fullest extent in difficult terrain and adverse driving conditions. Visit www.4x4training.com to develop or improve your driving skill.

Copyright 2017, Badlands Off-Road Adventures, Inc.

ARRL Audio News

ARRL Audio News - Fri, 11/10/2017 - 13:04

Friday, November 10, 2017

Categories: Amateur Radio

Temporary Shooting Closure in Lovell Canyon Extended for an Additional Year

4x4 Wire - Mon, 11/06/2017 - 11:04

LAS VEGAS – The Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest’s Spring Mountains National Recreation Area (SMNRA) has extended the temporary emergency shooting closure in Lovell Canyon for an additional year. The extended closure will allow the U.S. Forest Service to go through a formal decision-making process to determine what dispersed recreation activities are appropriate in Lovell Canyon and how they can best be managed. The closure area includes approximately 32,000 acres on both sides of Forest Service Road 45537 (Lovell Canyon Road).

Categories: Legislation

ARRL Audio News - November 3, 2017

ARRL Audio News - Fri, 11/03/2017 - 08:25
ARRL Audio News - November 3, 2017
Categories: Amateur Radio

ARRL Audio News - October 27, 2017

ARRL Audio News - Fri, 10/27/2017 - 07:00
ARRL Audio News - October 27, 2017
Categories: Amateur Radio

ARRL Audio News

ARRL Audio News - Fri, 10/20/2017 - 09:43

October 20, 2017

Categories: Amateur Radio

Surveys of endangered Mount Graham red squirrel show decline due to impacts from the Frye Fire

MuirNet - Thu, 10/19/2017 - 10:02
Mount Graham Red Squirrel

PHOENIX — An annual survey of the endangered Mount Graham red squirrel showed a significant decline due to the effects of the lightning caused Frye Fire in the Pinaleño Mountains of southeastern Arizona. 

The annual survey, conducted jointly by the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD), Coronado National Forest, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Arizona Center for Nature Conservation – Phoenix Zoo, and the University of Arizona, resulted in an estimate of only 35 squirrels. This is a significant decrease from the 252 squirrels estimated in 2016. Evidence of the Frye Fire was observed in 95% of the surveyed locations, 80% showed at least some habitat loss, and 44% were completely burned. 

Read More ...

Categories: Legislation

Drones and Wildfires - Benefits and Risks

4x4 Wire - Wed, 10/18/2017 - 10:25

As the California wildfires grow with devastating impacts on human life, property, and business, the potential unmanned aircraft system (UAS or drone) benefits and risks for firefighting (re)emerge. UAS stakeholders, including firefighters, are realizing the potential life-saving and fire response applications of UAS. Meanwhile, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and local emergency services remain on high alert for UAS that pose a risk to emergency responses.

Categories: Legislation

2m Hamming Off-Road

4x4 Wire - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 11:27

You recently got your ham ticket and are eager to experience ham radio while four wheeling.

Installing a mobile 2 meter/440 radio

You’re ready to make the leap to a mobile radio. Great! Even though this is your first rig, installing isn’t as difficult as it might seem. Of course, if you’re not comfortable buying the parts or doing the work, find a handy helper. Ask your Elmer or contact a local ham radio club.

This is not a step-by-step review. I just want to provide you on overview of the process and encourage you to do it yourself. Radio use and access is very personal. I want you to be happy and comfortable with your radio installation.

Categories: Legislation

ARRL Audio News

ARRL Audio News - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 09:33

October 13, 2017

Categories: Amateur Radio

Convenience of a 4-Door Model in a 2-Door Vehicle

4x4 Wire - Wed, 10/11/2017 - 19:50
Every once in a while a new product comes along that is a real game-changer for the 4WD community. It may not be flashy, but the product fills a void. Such is the case with the hinged side windows in the new hardtop for my Jeep Wrangler. What’s just as amazing is the story behind this tremendous find.

I was working on the Jeep one afternoon when this couple walks by. I know them vaguely, haven spoken a few times over the years. Jerry Mancini and his wife live about a block from me.  Jerry owns Rally Tops, www.rallytops.com, located in nearby Gardena, Calif. They make hardtops for a variety of off-road vehicles, as well as tonneaus and bed covers for pickups.

Categories: Legislation

Convenience of a 4-Door Model in a 2-Door Vehicle

Badlands Off Road Adventures - Wed, 10/11/2017 - 19:50

On the Rubicon Trail

Every once in a while a new product comes along that is a real game-changer for the 4WD community. It may not be flashy, but the product fills a void. Such is the case with the hinged side windows in the new hardtop for my Jeep Wrangler. What’s just as amazing is the story behind this tremendous find.

I was working on the Jeep one afternoon when this couple walks by. I know them vaguely, haven spoken a few times over the years. Jerry Mancini and his wife live about a block from me.  Jerry owns Rally Tops, www.rallytops.com, located in nearby Gardena, Calif. They make hardtops for a variety of off-road vehicles, as well as tonneaus and bed covers for pickups.

At the time my Wrangler had an old, zipper challenged, yellowing windows soft top. As he approached Jerry said, “Did you ever think of putting a hardtop on that vehicle?” Coincidentally, that thought had crossed my mind every time I tried to unzip the rear window. “I have a top that will fit,” he said.

During a conversation, as I toured his factory, I outlined what I wanted. Jerry said he’d kick around the idea. He called me one day to say he had a solution, and asked me to bring in the Jeep. After he described what he had in mind, I agreed and thought, “That’s nice.”

But after I got the Jeep back “nice’ just wasn’t descriptive enough. I couldn’t stop thinking that this is a really fantastic solution.

Jerry solved an issue that has been bugging the heck out of me for years. Because my Wrangler is a two-door, packing gear and retrieving supplies can be a challenge. It’s really tough to find all those small spaces in the back. I’d have to reach over the back seat or climb in through the tailgate while packing and retrieving.

Pop-up side windows are a godsend

These side windows are just what I needed. Each swings up like a tailgate window. Two small struts hold the windows up and out of the way; the keyed handles keep your gear secure. Those handles recess when in closed position so they don’t get caught on brush or other material.

The hardtop is made of fiberglass and inlaid with mildew-resistant carpet. When installed, you’d swear it’s a stock hardtop: It’s designed that well. I ordered black, but I believe he also offers white and tan.

It’s amazing the difference these windows make. Loading up is much more efficient. I can reach all those pockets and holes that previously were nearly inaccessible. I find I can pack more into the Wrangler because I can access from the sides.

Size comparison of the flip up window on the yellow LJ to a stock Jeep top on the silver LJ.

 

Retrieving stuff is equally slick. No more having to climb over the back seat or in past the tailgate. Just pop a window, and reach in. In the past I had to unload most of the vehicle to reach certain gear. Again, no more. Everything in the back of the Jeep is within arm’s reach. And I can reach it from the outside of the vehicle.

New windows pass an important test

Hinged windows may seem great on paper, but they must stand up to the rigors of four wheeling. If not, they’re of little value.

Soon after installing my new topper, I headed out on my annual Rubicon expedition. If you’ve done the Rubicon, you know how demanding it is – on humans and machines.

The route is dusty. It can – and did – rain, and rain heavily. And, of course, I got jostled about as only the Rubicon can do to you.

The new windows passed with flying colors. The locks never let go. The windows never popped open. There wasn’t a smidgen of dust or water in the cab. To say I was amazed is an understatement. In fact, I was flat out impressed.

Even though this was a one-off production, Jerry and his crew put their almost 3 decades of experience into it. The top fits like a glove, and the windows and window frames are of high quality. Jerry tells me that the top is a bit lighter than a stock hardtop, but it’s just as sturdy. I know I can count on years of worry-free use.

A couple quibbles with the new hardtop

Only two issues have come to light so far. For some reason, the locks on the driver side are keyed separately from the passenger side. My guess is that it’s a simple oversight. This was, after all, essentially a prototype.

I’d also like to see thicker bolt protectors on the undersides of the locks. Those bolt ends protrude quite a bit. If your vehicle is leaning toward you (causing the window edge to drop), you can bang your forehead on a bolt end. The bolt ends come covered with a small covering (see the image); a thicker and softer piece would be nice. I like the orange color. It’s easier to see them from a distance.

Window size comparison of a Rally Top on the left LJ to a stock Jeep LJ window on the right

 

Considering what a difference these windows make, I’m really surprised that more hardtops aren’t made this way. Whether Rally Tops will introduce the product I don’t know. I sense that if he were to begin production, Jerry would limit his hardtops Jeep models.

I’m sure he’s open to hearing from other 4WD enthusiasts. If you own a Jeep and are interested in learning more about the hardtop with the hinged windows, contact Jerry Mancini. He can be reached at 800-664-8677, or by email to sales@rallytops.com .

If Jerry realizes there is sufficient demand in the 4WD community for this type of hardtop, he might begin producing some models.

This is new window configuration is the perfect solution for a two-door Jeep Wrangler. The side windows make such a difference in being able to pack and retrieve your gear. I’m even more excited now to go four-wheeling. This new hard top has added a whole new dimension to my adventures. Perhaps one day you, too, will be able to enjoy the added benefits of this type of hardtop.

#    #    #

Did you miss the previous article? Some Upcoming Events (click on the link for details)

West side of Long Valley Caldera in CA

Summary of upcoming events.

October 2017

November 2017

December 2017

We have new stock of all colors!

Yellow is back in stock! The Orange and Red went fast last time with blue not far behind so if you want a specific color order now while we have most of them available. The Bandana layout follows the “Vehicle Recovery Plan” with pathways to more detail. A unique section of the Bandana, gives the steps for a “Winch Rigging Check: Walk through” so that you verify every element of the rigging before you commit to the pull. Stuff this in your recovery kit and you will always be ready. Warning – the Bandana is not a substitute for proper training and use of quality equipment used within the bounds of their safe working load. We advise you to use the information provided in the Winching Recovery Bandana at your own risk. We cannot control the quality and specifications of the equipment used and the methods actually employed. The original press release with larger graphics is on the website .

73
KI6FHA
I hope to see you on the trails!
Tom Severin, President
Badlands Off Road Adventures, Inc.
4-Wheel Drive School
310-613-5473
www.4x4training.com
Make it Fun. Keep it Safe.

#####

If you find this information valuable, please pass it on to a friend. You can forward them the email. If you received a forwarded copy of this newsletter and would like to subscribe for yourself, go to: www.4x4training.com/contacts.html and follow the instructions to join our mail list.

Want To Use This Article In Your Magazine, E-Zine, Club Newsletter Or Web Site?
You are welcome to use it anytime, just be sure to include the following author/copyright information: Tom Severin, 4×4 Coach, teaches 4WD owners how to confidently and safely use their vehicles to the fullest extent in difficult terrain and adverse driving conditions. Visit www.4x4training.com to develop or improve your driving skill.

Copyright 2017, Badlands Off-Road Adventures, Inc.

Restore the Antiquities Act’s Noble Vision

MuirNet - Wed, 10/11/2017 - 15:16
House Committee on Natural Resources

By: Rep. Rob Bishop (R-UT)
Chairman, House Committee on Natural Resources
October 11, 2017

In a Tuesday op-ed, I explained the constitutional threat posed by the Antiquities Act, and why its repeated abuse is inconsistent with the constitutional pillars of the rule of law and checks and balances. As it turns out, there's a reason the Founders chose these principles as the basis of our government: arbitrary rule has no incentive to be accountable to the people that policies affect. Without that accountability, political and ideological manipulation corrodes the balance of power.  

Read More ...

Categories: Legislation

Antiquities Act is a Menace to Constitutional Government

MuirNet - Tue, 10/10/2017 - 10:59
House Committee on Natural Resources

By: Rep. Rob Bishop (R-UT)
Chairman, House Committee on Natural Resources

You heard it in your high school civics class: America has "a government of laws and not of men." The rule of law is the basis of the constitutional order erected by the Founders. "A government with unpredictable and arbitrary laws poisons the blessings of liberty itself." The first axiom is from John Adams, the second is from James Madison. Their sentiments were universal in the founding generation and ought to continue today. Checks and balances have no teeth when our leaders can disregard the laws and rule according to their whims.  

Read More ...

Categories: Legislation

ARRL Audio News

ARRL Audio News - Fri, 10/06/2017 - 10:23

October 6, 2017

Categories: Amateur Radio

ARRL Audio News - September 29, 2017

ARRL Audio News - Fri, 09/29/2017 - 10:05
ARRL Audio News - September 29, 2017
Categories: Amateur Radio

ARRL Audio News - September 22, 2017

ARRL Audio News - Fri, 09/22/2017 - 13:51
ARRL Audio News - September 22, 2017
Categories: Amateur Radio

FWS Report Underscores Importance of Public Lands

MuirNet - Fri, 09/22/2017 - 11:25
New 5-Year Report Shows 101.6 Million Americans Participated in Hunting, Fishing & Wildlife Activities - U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Survey Preliminary Findings Show Importance of Increasing Access to Public Lands

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of the Interior announced a new report by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that shows that 101.6 million Americans—40 percent of the U.S. population 16 years old and older—participated in wildlife-related activities in 2016, such as hunting, fishing and wildlife-watching.

The survey illustrates gains in wildlife watching—particularly around the home—and fishing, with moderate declines in the number of hunters nationally. The findings reflect a continued interest in engaging in the outdoors. These activities are drivers behind an economic powerhouse, where participants spent $156 billion—the most in the last 25 years, adjusted for inflation.

“This report absolutely underscores the need to increase public access to public lands across the United States,” said U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke. “Hunting and fishing are a part of the American heritage. As a kid who grew up hunting and fishing on public lands who later took my own kids out on the same land, I know how important it is to expand access for future generations. Many folks east of the Mississippi River rely on friends with large acreages or pay high rates for hunting and fishing clubs. This makes access to wildlife refuges and other public lands more important.”

On his first day in office, Secretary Zinke reversed an order that would have banned lead ammo and fishing tackle on National Wildlife Refuge lands, and he began the process of expanding hunting and fishing opportunities on public lands across the Department.

In August, the Secretary announced a proposal to expand hunting and fishing opportunities at 10 national wildlife refuges, and he announced the initial stages of a plan to acquire land to make the Bureau of Land Management Sabinoso Wilderness Area accessible for the first time ever to hunters, hikers and wildlife watchers.

In addition, Secretary Zinke recently made recommendations to President Trump on 27 national monuments that call for changes to some that, while still protecting the land, would also protect and expand public access to that land for citizens who want to hunt, fish and hike and experience the joy and beauty of these special places.

The survey, the 13th in a series conducted nearly every five years since 1955, shows that the most substantial increases in participation involve wildlife-watching—observing, feeding and photographing wildlife. The report indicates these activities surged 20 percent from 2011 to 2016, from 71.8 million to 86 million participants during that time. Expenditures by wildlife watchers also rose sharply—28 percent—between 2011 and 2016, from $59.1 billion to $75.9 billion. Around-the-home wildlife-watching increased 18 percent from 2011, from 68.6 million in 2011 to 81.1 million participants in 2016. More modest gains were made for away-from-home wildlife watchers: 5 percent increase from 2011 to 2016, from 22.5 million to 23 million participants.

More Americans also went fishing. The report indicates an 8 percent increase in angling participation since 2011, from 33.1 million anglers to 35.8 million in 2016. The greatest increases in participation—10 percent—were seen in the Great Lakes area. Total expenditures by anglers nationwide rose 2 percent from 2011 to 2016, from $45 billion to $46.1 billion.

Hunting participation dropped by about 2 million participants but still remained strong at 11.5 million hunters. Total expenditures by hunters declined 29 percent from 2011 to 2016, from $36.3 billion to $25.6 billion. However, expenditures for related items such as taxidermy and camping equipment experienced a 27-percent uptick, and hunting trip-related expenses increased 15 percent.?

Regarding the decrease in participation in hunting, Zinke said: “Hunters and anglers are at the backbone of American conservation, so the more sportsmen and women we have, the better off our wildlife will be. Some of our wildlife refuges have great mentored hunting programs. I'd like to see these programs replicated and expanded across the country and reach into areas where kids don't traditionally get the opportunity to hunt, fish and? ?connect with wildlife. Some of my best family time growing up and raising my own kids was hunting an elk, enjoying a pheasant, or reeling in a rainbow. These are the memories and traditions I want to share with future generations.”

“No one does more for our wildlife and or wild places than hunters. Any decline in hunting numbers, real or perceived, is of great concern since hunting provides the lion’s share of funding for nationwide conservation work thanks to excise taxes on firearms, ammunition and archery equipment that garner more than $1.6 annually,” said David Allen, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation president and CEO. “The RMEF remains committed to growing and ensuring the future of our hunting heritage as well as elk, other wildlife and their habitat.”

This year’s survey also gathered two new categories of data: archery and target shooting. Findings show there are more than 32 million target shooters using firearms and 12.4 million people engaged in archery, not including hunting.

“Hunters and anglers form the foundation of wildlife conservation in the United States, consistently generating more funding for habitat and wildlife management than any other source,” said U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Principal Deputy Director Greg Sheehan. “Industry, federal and state fish and wildlife agency initiatives that focus on hunter and angler recruitment, retention and reactivation are crucial to sustaining these conservation dollars and ensuring the next generation of wildlife enthusiasts have the opportunity, access and awareness to pursue these time-honored American traditions.”

“I praise Secretary Zinke for his support of hunting and land access. The hunting and shooting sports community is grateful for an administration that recognizes the economic, recreational and traditional values of hunting and target shooting," said John Frampton, President and CEO of the Council to Advance Hunting and the Shooting Sports. "Although the numbers of hunters have declined, we are optimistic they will rebound as a result of Secretary Zinke's leadership, state wildlife agencies, non-government organizations and industries working together. Hunting in this country is not only part of our national heritage, it is an important to our country’s economy, as indicated by the expenditures in the survey.”

As a partnership effort with states and national conservation organizations, the survey has become one of the most important sources of information on fish and wildlife recreation in the United States. Federal, state and private organizations use this detailed information to manage wildlife, market products, and look for trends. Conducted by the U.S. Bureau of the Census, the survey is based on a 22,416-household sample surveyed through computer-assisted telephone and in-person interviews. 

For more information about the survey and to view the preliminary report, please visit https://wsfrprograms.fws.gov/Subpages/NationalSurvey/National_Survey.htm

Categories: Legislation

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